Modes of Estrangement

 

5 channel video installation

 

 

Pasiphaë ( Greek: Πασιφάη) was the mother of "starlike" Asterion, called by the Greeks the Minotaur, after a curse from Poseidon caused her to experience lust for and mate with a white bull sent by Poseidon. The Bull was the old pre-Olympian Poseidon.

In the Greek literalistic understanding of a Minoan myth in order to actually copulate with the bull, she had the Athenian artificer Daedalus construct a portable wooden cow with a cowhide covering, within which she was able to satisfy her strong desire. The effect of the Greek interpretation was to reduce a more-than-human female, daughter of the Sun itself, to a stereotyped emblem of grotesque bestiality and the shocking excesses of female sensuality and deceit.

 

Touching and reflecting, among others, on themes of bestiality, female sexuality, female empowerment, human and animal hybrids, metamorphosis and equality, this work attempts to reintroduce the myth of Pasiphaë as a woman who is no longer a prisoner to male imposed sexual urges but has taken control of her own sexuality and is not ashamed of her desire for the bull.  Drawing inspiration from folkloristic performances and bestial masquerades, we see her wearing a mask, not for the purpose of hiding her identity, but in order to come closer to the nature of the beast she is trying to entice.  In pagan and folkloric traditions these rituals of metamorphosis, from human to animal, partially of in full, are praise to the fertility of the body or the land. She is naked from the waist down, presenting her body not for the purpose of reproduction, but for the purpose of her own sexual gratification.

The work also relocates the setting of the myth from ancient Crete to contemporary Athens, in order to connect it and make a comment on the sociopolitical situation that Greece finds itself in today.

 

Default 5 exhibition_Tsalapatas Museum_Volos_2015

Default 5 exhibition_Tsalapatas Museum_Volos_2015

Babel Fragments Revisited_Taf The Art Foundation_Athens 2015

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